Brussels sprouts and jasmine rice

Steam some rice

Splash on some coconut aminos

Add some steamed Brussels sprouts and sprinkle on a little garlic powder and ground black pepper and additional coconut aminos to taste.  Enjoy!

Quick and flavorful red cabbage and kale over rice

This recipe is too easy to be so delicious and healthy.

INGREDIENTS

1-1/2 cups white jasmine rice (dry) steamed

Veggies:

1/2 head red cabbage, chopped

1 bunch kale, chopped

3 spring onions, chopped

Sauce:

4 TBSP coconut aminos

2 tsp garlic powder

1 TBSP coconut palm sugar

2 TBSP cornstarch

1/2 tsp fresh ground pepper

1/3 cup water

INSTRUCTIONS 

Dry fry veggies without water or oil in a large wok or skillet until starting to soften.

Add remaining ingredients and stir constantly until sauce thickens.  Put rice in a large bowl, add a generous shaking of coconut aminos, top with veggie mixture, enjoy.

Bean thread noodle soup with sea vegetables

This is a meal that I try to eat about once per month.  It has more steps than my usual rice and steamed vegetables, but it is an ultra-high-carb delight.  This meal is perfect for athletes who will be heavily exerting themselves the day after eating this meal because it really gets you carbed up.

INGREDIENTS (serves 1)

1 kombu strip (or 1/4 cup kelp flakes)

1/4 cup arame and 3 TBSP Pacific wakame soaked in 4 cups of water for at least 10 minutes

Liquid smoke or smoked sea salt

3 medium carrots (I used rainbow carrots) either cut into ribbons or matchsticks

1/4 cup chickpea miso (I use chickpea miso because I do not eat soy, but I would expect soy miso would be fine)

1 bag (5 nests) cellophane bean thread noodles (rice stick noodles will work, too)

6 scallions or spring onions, chopped

1/4 cup of coconut aminos (or soy sauce if you eat soy)

a few drops of toasted sesame oil

1 TBSP rice cooking wine

Notes:

I ran out of South River chickpea miso so I used Miso Master instead, which is less chunky and has much more sodium than South River but which is cheaper to buy in bulk.

The sea vegetables will greatly expand once they have soaked.

I usually shave the carrots into ribbons, but today I decided to chop them into slivers because it was quicker.

Use only the green stems of the scallions.


INSTRUCTIONS:

1.  Put kombu into 4 cups of water in a pot and heat on high until boiling.  Simmer on low for 4 minutes.


2.  Remove and discard the kombu, keeping the clear broth.


3.  Add a few drops of liquid smoke or a dash of smoked sea salt then add carrots.


4.  Add the miso and whisk it in with a fork or whisk.


5.  Add the rice cooking wine, coconut aminos, and a few drops of toasted sesame oil.


6.  Put noodle nests into the bottom of a large stock pot.  Pour the miso broth and carrots over the noodles. Add the arame and wikame together with their soaking liquid.  Simmer for 8 minutes.  


7.  Add chopped scallions.  Simmer an additional two minutes.


8.  Ready to eat.  You can add more coconut aminos or toasted sesame oil to taste. Sometimes I also add portabello mushroom caps which I have dry fried with coconut aminos until charred and then cut into strips.


NUTRITION

Interestingly, these noodles are made completely from the starch of mung beans and have 43 carbs per serving.

Since I ate 5 servings, I consumed 215 grams of carbs. Calories were 900, plus the veggies and broth and miso which added another 200. Although the noodles don’t have much nutritive value other than helping me to get carbed up, the carrots and sea vegetables add 3 grams of fiber, over 100% of my daily iron, 11% of my magnesium, 11% calcium, 18% vitamin C, 15% vitamin B6, and 410% vitamin A.

After eating this meal, I was unbelievably full, yet my total calories for the day were only about 1800. Before bed I will probably eat a gluten-free soft pretzel with mustard as a snack so my total daily caloric intake will be slightly under 2000 even though I will feel as though I ate 5000 calories today. I felt VERY well fed throughout the day, especially after eating this huge portion of soup. This lifestyle is certainly not one based upon food restriction. Instead, it is based upon eating large amounts of delicious foods while avoiding cholesterol and eating no more than 10% of your daily calories from fat and protein.